Mean Motor Scooter “Hindu Flying Machine” Review

Mean Motor Scooter’s Hindu Flying Machine is more of a journey than an album, but it’s a particularly pleasant ride nonetheless. Over the course of ten tracks, peculiarities are to be expected. For the most part, they work. A track-by-track review begins below.

We’re Not Alone – Right after the first few riffs, the song plunges the listener into a feast of powerful bass lines. The double time is a surprisingly effective push, and the lo-fi vocals strike an interesting aural imagery of a long-forgotten time.

“Wavespotting” – Sporadic drums guide us through the jungle of a 60s comic scene. The power chords partnered with the bass fuel the ride even further like a vintage mustang sailing in the air above the Mississippi River. It’s a short ride, but it gives enough kick to keep the listener (and possibly a crowd) hyped.

“Sea Serpent” – This one set off with a nearly clean guitar riff, dropping in some serious punches with the full blown band. The vocals are over-driven, reminiscent of Franz Ferdinand.

“Cosmonaut” – Reverb and distortion are king here. What makes this track a standout is its similarity to “Welcome to the Black Parade” by MCR, rendering rendering a satisfying listen between each section. The interlude in particular was a nice touch, and its overall quality is a nice surprise.

“Lizard Man” – Things begin to pick up with “Lizard Man.” While not much of a standout as its predecessors, it features a pretty nice, although short, guitar solo.

“Shape Shifter” – It begins to feel a little routine by this point. The keyboard adds a nice touch, while the bassline is jumpy as always. The female vocals once again pour plenty of life into the track.

“Sam, the Homosapein” – The opening’s immediately sounds very AC/DC, yet with a clean and playful rhythm. The lyrics bring tangible imagery to the mind, and one can clearly visualize the footsteps of the Homosapein.

“Come and Get It” ­– The overall vintage feel is revitalized here. Still in a bit of a routine sonic-wise, but this time it works in the album’s favor.

“Dr.Benway” – This track is more like a succession to the previous track than a song on its own. The keyboard is much more pronounced than in previous tracks.

“Brainhole” – We finally reach the closing track of the album as well as the frenetic journey it took us on. While “Brainhole” could have been better suited for a “middle track,” it still works here. We get a nice summary of the musical themes and motifs.

Verdict: There are indeed some surprises here and there, and the song Cosmonaut is one to keep an eye on. Even though a main criticism its “routine” nature, that’s actually where the album shines the most. It’s familiar. There’s plenty to digest here, and overall Hindu Flying Machine is worth more than one listen.