Posted on Leave a comment

Throwback: My Interview With Rasheeda

In 2012 I spoke with rapper Rasheeda, best known for her appearances in Love & Hip Hop: ATL. Back then, I had the Bold & Sugar blog and big dreams, and honey did I ever shoot high!

Rasheeda was a delight to talk to, and this interview in particular helped propel me out of my small town and onto my journey to bigger things.

Curious how the conversation went? Read below:

DIMITRIUS:

First question, how did you get started in the industry and what the point that you said “I want to be a rapper.”

RASHEEDA:

I think it was when I was little. I love music. I used to sing and dance and rap and jump around like I was going on when I was a little girl. But, you know, when I was barely a teenager, I will probably say I met some other girls who had the desire to scan the map and stuff.

So we just decided to become a little group and start bouncing around and you know, I just fell in love with music. I was in a big girl rap group called Da Kaperz and put an album out in like ’98. And after that, people started growing up a little. We wanted to go in different directions.

And at that point, I realized, okay, I’m not going up here because I want to do a little art. And then I’m feeling like you don’t want to move forward. Alright. Music as a solo artist.

DIMITRIUS:

Your latest project is Boss Chick Music, right? What was it like getting that done?

RASHEEDA:

I make the recording process less stressful for myself. I just can go in and try to have fun with it. You can’t just pound yourself over the head and be crazy. I let him speak to me. I do what comes from the heart. I do music based on experiences, things I’ve seen. That’s how I get down now, you know, my swag, my thing. And that’s exactly what Boss Chick Music is. It’s just empowering.

DIMITRIUS:

And so I do have to go ahead and tell you that everybody down here is bumping “Marry Me.” What inspired you to write that? What did you want people to get out of it?

RASHEEDA:

You know, the years of doing anything for free is over really. You know, it was was just fun, a fun record.

DIMITRIUS:

What direction do you want this whole project to take you in?

RASHEEDA:

Ultimately, I want people to get into Rasheeda. I have a great fan base, you know, and, and my fans do ride hard for me. And with being a part of something else, with an extremely big album, I’m open to captivating more people and bringing them into Rasheeda’s world.

DIMITRIUS:

Tell us how you feel about the show [Love & Hip Hop: ATL]. In general, what what is your stance on it at the moment?

RASHEEDA:

There’s a lot going on right now. It’s definitely a platform you don’t really know what to expect until the show airs and things start happening. It goes from zero to 60 in like 1.1 seconds.

But also going into it, you know, I don’t think any of us anticipated it being the biggest show on television. And that’s something that a lot of people look forward to, doing television and stuff, but when you just, BAM, come into it and the first show you’re on is the biggest reality show, and you’re like “Wow!”

DIMITRIUS:

How does that even feel, just being in front of the cameras constantly?

RASHEEDA:

You kinda understand when you sign the dotted line that you’re signing up for something you ain’t used to [Laughs]. After a while the cameras are just there you know, as far as like, the personal life and how things affect you.

DIMITRIUS:

A lot of people are expressing that shows like Love & Hip Hop, Basketball Wives, Real Housewives, are portraying black people in a certain way. Do you think this is the case?

RASHEEDA:

I think that what people gotta understand is when you when you doing shows like this, the things that go on in people’s lives, reality shows, the reality sometimes is things are fucked up. You know?

I don’t know a person who wakes up every single day and is just pure bliss and happiness. People go through things like this with their families or with their friends or with their career going on. And the thing about it is, when it comes to our show, it’s a lot of drama, a lot of things going on, but you have to entertain people. Nobody’s gonna sit and watch a show that’s all happiness all the time.

And at the end of the day what kinda pisses me off though is you get these people who they want to say “They’re showing people in the wrong light.” Well on our so you have a black, a married woman and man with a family.

DIMITRIUS:

So right at this moment, who is someone that you would like to collaborate with?

RASHEEDA:

I gotta say Jay-Z, Kanye. That that drains me. Oh, geez, who else? Beyonce, you know, I like Rihanna. Artists like that.

DIMITRIUS:

So would you suggest rappers doing their own thing being independent?

RASHEEDA:

Nowadays, I don’t think you really have a choice on it, because it’s just not the same business that it was years ago. Nowadays if you are able to secure a deal, they want a piece of damn near everything you got, and what messes us up is when we’re done rapping and doing what we’re doing in the next few years you ain’t got nothing.

Because the record company is taking a piece of everything you’re doing from your shows, to get endorsements, to record sales. I mean, you already don’t see no money as it is being tied to a label and selling units unless you sell gargantuan numbers. And that’s not what’s up right now in the industry. So you know, in being independent, it takes work. It’s hard.

DIMITRIUS:

The last question I have for you is, what is your bold statement?

RASHEEDA:

I’m a driven, motivated, very family oriented woman who’s just trying to live the best possible life I can live, stand for what I believe in, stay focused, stay strong, empower women. And just leave this place knowing that I made people feel empowered and made them feel good.

<You can listen to the aduio below>